LGBTQ+ Rights

The Love is Never Wrong team advocates for better representation and future for young LGBTQ+ members under NYC school systems. We wish to empower people to create support groups in their schools and tackle oppression against LGBTQ+ rather than overlooking it.

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Research Question

What policy changes could NYC schools enact to further the protection and acknowledgment of LGBTQ+ students?

Introduction

Our team behind the social platform, Love is Never Wrong, has used this summer to educate themselves on the mistreatment of our peers in the LBGTQ+ community. We have used this summer design program to open the hearts and minds of those unaffected by these issues. We encourage the public to fill out the census and vote in the upcoming 2020 election for the sake of our future and the betterment of our society.  

In our presentation, we draw concern toward the LGBTQ+ community. Our research explores the experiences of LGBTQ+ youth. We are able to support these kids in the same manner that we care and defend ourselves. We believe creating a better environment for the LBGTQ+ can set the stage to de-stigmatize gender differences. Some may criticize the idea of the LBGTQ+ community growing because they fear change. As we continue to become a more progressive society, we must make space for all people regardless of gender and sexual preference. 

 

Our research has been inspired by Ted Williams and other influential figures in the LBGTQ+ community. In addition, we include data collected by organizations such as the Trevor Project, HRC, and much more. We hope our work opens your hearts, increases curiosity, and awareness. Do not wait for change. As Mahatma Gandhi said, “Be the change you wish to see in the world.”

Public Service Announcement

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The Empire State Building illuminates rainbow lights on June 30th, the last day of Pride Month, and the day the Annual NYC Pride Parade takes place. Therefore, in itself, it depicts a sense of pride, support, and hope for those in our communities that are LGBTQ+. As Mayor de Blasio said in a statement, “Lighting our skyline will remind LGBTQ people around the world that New York City will always be a beacon of hope and a place to call home,”

Infographic

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Many members of the LGBTQ+ community face difficulties with acceptance in their communities, from their own household or in a workplace setting. Our infographic focuses on such, as well as highlights a large amount of estimated GNC or Transgender students to face discrimination and disapproval for their identity, and how it affects them in the long run. Although the infographic ends with a bitter-tasting message, it depicts the hope for destigmatizing and acceptance for our peers.

Final Proposal

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The Love is Never Wrong team proposed many solutions for the representation of the community, and how to increase the understanding of our peers. 

We’ve come up with multiple solutions that we feel will help create a safer space for LGBTQ+ Youth in schools. Our first solution includes creating a school history curriculum surrounding the history of the LGBTQ+ community and how it got them to where they are today. Due to many children not being exposed to the normality of the concept and in some circumstances, are only influenced by their parent’s personal opinion, they share the ignorant mindset when it comes to understanding their LGBTQ+ peers. Additionally, including Gender-Neutral Bathrooms in schools will give GNC and Trans students less stress in entering restrooms. Last but not least, many LGBTQ+ students need support from their peers and those around them. Therefore, Social Workers in schools to act as support for LGBTQ+ Youth and After School support groups for LGBTQ+ youth funded by the school would be a sufficient method.

In order to go through with these solutions, we need as much support as we can get.

 

Please sign our petition at:

https://www.change.org/p/nyc-government-school-s-lgbtq-youth-representation-in-nyc?redirect=false, or even just show you care to your LGBTQ+ peers. A little goes a long way.

Meet the Team

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Fadilah A.

My name is Fadilah and I am an upcoming junior art major at Fiorello H. LaGuardia Arts high school. I aspired to major in the arts for reasons such as expressing my dreams through art rather than speech and to advocate to deconstruct harmful social constructs that I feel strongly about.

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Chey B.

I'm Chey, I'm 15 from NYC and I recently came out as lesbian and nonbinary. I Chose the LGBT topic because it's very important that my community gets representation and acknowledgment from our peers and the people around us.

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Alejandro D.

I'm 13 years old and going into 8th grade at Launch Charter School. I'm bisexual so I chose the LGBTQ+ group because I was in a group at my school and saw how the LGBTQ+ community was getting treated. I want to help the community in any way possible so they have the freedom to express themselves.

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Fredrick M.

Hello, my name is Fredrick, I'm a 7th grader attending Saint Hope Leadership academy. I decided to join the LGBTQ group because I believe that everyone has the right to love freely and deserves equality no matter what they believe in. We’re all humans and should be treated equally.

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Rita M.

I’m Rita, an upcoming 11th grader at Bronx health sciences High school and I chose this topic because I firmly believe that sexual orientation and gender identity should never lead to discrimination or abuse. People around the world face violence and inequality, sometimes torture, even execution because of whom they love, how they look, or who they are. We advocate for laws and policies that will protect everyone’s dignity, where all people can fully enjoy their rights.

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Samuel M.

I’m Samuel, a 14-year-old from Ballet Tech Middle School in NYC. I am straight, but I chose this topic because of the way the LGBTQ+ community gets treated just because of what they do, wear, or whom they love. This relates to me because being black and doing ballet is not something you see often and sometimes communicates the idea that I’m gay or weird when that’s not the case.